EXHIBITION DESCRIPTIONS

Driving While Black

Driving While Black


Toshiko Takaezu

Toshiko Takaezu

Driving While Black

February 23 - May 26, 2019

Noyes Museum of Art, Kramer Hall

The Negro Motorist Green Book (Green Book) was an annual guidebook for African-America travelers. It was originated and published by New York City mailman Victor Hugo Green from 1936 to 1966, during the era of Jim Crow Laws,  when open and often legally prescribed discrimination against non-whites was widespread. In  a 1949 version of the Green Book stated optimistically that “there will be a day some time in the near future when this guide will not have to be published.”  Given recent events in places like Ferguson and Baltimore, combined with years of police violence and racial profiling, is traveling for African Americans safe? This exhibition will suggest that the statement in 1949 may be premature. Presented in a multi-layer approach, with both artifacts and  art, the exhibition will provide the visitor with historical references, contemporary conversations and opportunities for civil dialogue and discourse.  



Toshiko Takaezu

April 12 - June 23, 2019

Noyes Arts Garage

Toshiko Takaezu, a Japanese-American ceramic artist known for her closed vessels, became internationally influential by presenting her pots as sculpture. She is celebrated as a formidable modernist whose style is epitomized by unrestrained brush strokes and splashes of glaze over her signature ceramic forms. Takaezu taught for 25 years at Princeton University and, for 35 years, she was an annual visiting artist at Skidmore College where she made her largest works. From her students, she shaped a generation of artists and selected the majority of her apprentices. 

The impact of Toshiko Takaezu on the field of ceramics and contemporary art is well documented, yet her role as mentor, equally important to her, is too often overlooked. From the mid-1970s until the last year of her life, Takaezu chose one apprentice each year to live and work at her home and studio in Quakertown, New Jersey.


Jack Knight

Jack Knight

Jack Knight

June - August 2019

Noyes Museum of Art, Kramer Hall

My paintings have evolved from Geometric Abstraction to what I refer to as “Symbolic Visual Expression”. The word “symbol” is defined as, “something that suggests or represents something elseSymbols often take the form of words, visual images or gestures that are used to convey ideas and beliefs.”

It is the choice of the viewer to establish or interpret the content of the composition as an intuitive impression or association, reflecting on the visual symbols in play. Nothing more, nothing less.